Monday, December 1, 2014

SABALLY FINALLY GOES HOME



 
Momodou Sabally
The Standard-Two days after he was granted bail by a high court judge, Momodou Sabally, the former secretary general and minister of presidential affairs has finally been released from Mile 2 Central Prison last evening.
Earlier yesterday his lawyer, Antouman Gaye, confirmed  to The Standard . “Yes, he is [still] in custody because we are still trying to fulfill the bail conditions.”  
Sabally, 40, was granted bail on Tuesday, four months and three weeks after he was arrested for allegedly causing economic loss to the state.
He was to be released on bail on furnishing a personal bond in the sum of D1.5 million with one surety for the like amount to the satisfaction of the court.

Rural poverty in The Gambia


Rural women deserve more than simple recognition



Standard.gm-The most vulnerable groups in the rural parts of The Gambia are women, children and the elderly, as well as ethnic minorities who live in remote areas. The majority of these women continue to play a subservient role. Despite being the hardest hit, they contribute to the well-being of their families and the development of rural economies. 
And despite their efforts in providing food for their family, they have little or no say in the way the family spends its income. Women form more than 50 percent of the Gambian population and yet they are the poorest. 
Like women all over the world, most Gambian women must work as a matter of economic necessity, combining motherhood and child care with labour in the fields, or working as household domestic, market vendors and traders. 
The Gambia remains predominantly agricultural. The increasing migration of rural male labourers to urban areas has sharply extended the feminisation of rural labour and agriculture. Subsistence farming is largely a female activity owing to the historical migration of men to the towns. This is a trend that is still going on. Like in many of the world's poorer countries, these women play a vital role in the rural economy. They are involved in crop production and livestock care, provide food and water for their families, and carry out other activities to diversify their families' livelihood.